backup og meta

Sex While Having Menstruation: Is it Still OK to Do the Deed?

Written by Stephanie Nera, RPh, PharmD · Pharmacology


Updated Jul 01, 2021

Sex While Having Menstruation: Is it Still OK to Do the Deed?

Plainly put, menstrual periods are never fun. Nobody enjoys the week or so of hormone fluctuations, cramping, and, of course, the mess. However, having your period doesn’t mean you have to suffer. While it may sound taboo, sex while having menstruation is possible and more common than you think. Let’s talk about what to expect and dispel some myths about sex during red days.

Note: This information is purely from a medical standpoint. Some religious and cultural beliefs may not support the act of sex during menstruation.

Sex While Having Menstruation: The Myths

1. You can’t get pregnant

This is definitely one of the biggest myths of sex while having menstruation. Please remember that while the risk of getting pregnant during your period is very low, it is never zero.

During a woman’s period, the uterine lining is shredding, so the chance of implantation is low. However, sperm cells can survive for 5 to 7 days, so fertilization and implantation can still occur at the end of menstruation for women who have irregular period, especially if they engaged in unprotected sex. In other words, there is a possibility of her fertile window overlapping with her period.

Additionally, instances of light bleeds may not be menstrual bleeding but rather spotting due to ovulation or implantation. In this case, the risk of pregnancy is higher or has already occurred. That’s why it is important to track your cycles as well as be familiar with menstrual blood colors.

sex while having menstruation

Bottom line: Engaging in unprotected sex or not using birth control always carries some risk of pregnancy. However, menstruation is the least fertile time of any woman’s cycle and indicates that she is not currently pregnant.

2. Sex while having menstruation is unhealthy

This is not necessarily true. The act of sex is a normal and healthy part of many people’s lives. However, it is normal for people to be squeamish or turned off by the thought of blood. Menstruation is not really the most enticing concept, but many couples make it work.

As long as you and your partner have tested negative for STDs and are fully vaccinated, sex while having menstruation does not increase the risk of infection. Exposure to period blood will not spread infections unless it touches an open wound. However, during a woman’s period, her immune system may become vulnerable, putting her at risk of catching colds or infections.

Therefore, proper hygiene and knowing your status is always important.

3. It can cause more pain or discomfort

Actually, the opposite is true! While cramping and dysmenorrhea can make women want to curl up and stay in bed, physical activity is actually encouraged. Getting some exercise either through jogging (or having sex) can get your blood pumping and release much-needed endorphins. Happy hormones boost your mood and relieve pain. Plus, spending some quality time with your partner is an added perk.

Benefits

While most women have periods that last for a week or less, sometimes there is, indeed, an urge. Increased libido during menstruation is actually normal due to the drop in progesterone, which is also responsible for the uterine lining shedding. So, if you have ever felt more “in the mood” during your period, it’s not just your imagination.

The many health benefits of sex have been talked about for ages. From improving your mood, to relieving headaches, to burning additional calories, it seems to be a simple fix for many things. Not to mention the boost in libido and natural lubrication can make it more pleasurable. For those who are single or in a long-distance relationship, masturbation can also bring these benefits.

Additionally, couples who are open to the idea or have already engaged in sex while having menstruation may feel a closer connection because of it. However, the key here is open communication. Not everyone will be interested in trying it, but that does not mean it’s time to call it quits.

Tips and tricks

Having sex while having menstruation is considered acceptable, but it is not everyone’s cup of tea. If you are planning on trying it soon, it is good to be prepared. First, you need to discuss it with your partner. It’s never a good idea to trick your partner, especially when it comes to intimate acts.

Next, prep yourself and your bed because things will get a little messy. Washing yourself before and after sex should be normal practice, regardless if you have your period or not. This will remove excess menstrual blood before you get into bed. Naturally, you don’t want stains on your bedsheets, so opt for darker-colored bedding or place a few towels down.

However, it is important to point out that most women will only shed up to 80 mL of menstruation. This means that in a single day, the amount is roughly about a tablespoon or two. So, the mess will not be as bad as most people imagine.

If you want to skip the additional laundry load, you may want to consider shower sex. This prevents stains and allows for quick clean-up. Plus, you may not notice the blood as much. However, take it slow and be careful of slips!

Lastly, set the mood with a bit of ambient lighting. This will make the blood less noticeable and make both partners less self-conscious about their bodies.

Alternatively, some menstrual cups are designed to hold blood but still allow couples to have sex. If you have a heavy flow, you may want to hold off until the last few days of your period. Couples can also consider doing anal sex as an alternative while a woman is on her period.

Key Takeaways

In summary, sex while having menstruation may sound off-putting for some but it does have some benefits. Releasing endorphins, relieving discomfort, and improving communication with your partner are all plus points. If you are trying to get pregnant, this is not the ideal time to try with your partner– but there is still a small chance it can happen.

Learn other Sex Tips here. 

Disclaimer

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Written by

Stephanie Nera, RPh, PharmD

Pharmacology


Updated Jul 01, 2021

advertisement iconadvertisement

Was this article helpful?

advertisement iconadvertisement
advertisement iconadvertisement