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7 Sex Myths Debunked

7 Sex Myths Debunked

Despite the availability of facts, misinformation about sex still abounds. One reason for this is the people’s hesitance in approaching a healthcare expert about their sexual health concerns. Also, nowadays, it’s very easy to spread sex myths through different social media platforms. Anyone can post anything and make them seem factual. In this article, we’ll debunk 7 of the most common myths about sex.

Why It’s Crucial To Debunk Sex Myths

At best, believing in sex myths is unhelpful to your sexual health concerns. At worst, it can endanger your health. For instance, believing that the use of a condom alone can protect you from sexually-transmitted diseases can make you abandon other important steps, such as getting to know your partner or receiving the HIV vaccine.

With that said, below are some of the most common myths about sex and the truth behind them.

7 Sex Myths, Debunked

1. The Hymen Can Indicate Whether a Woman Had Penetrative Sex Before

To this day, some people still believe that an intact hymen is a sign of virginity.

But experts say there’s no such thing as an “intact” hymen. The size and shape of the hymen varies from woman to woman. Likewise, it usually doesn’t cover the entire vaginal opening, so it’s not exactly a barrier that breaks upon a woman’s first penetrative sex.

Some women are born without a hymen, while others are born with one that covers the entire vaginal opening (imperforate hymen). The latter requires surgical treatment because vaginal discharge cannot pass out the body.

Also, besides sex, other strenuous activities can cause hymen tearing.

2. Virginity is a Black and White Concept

For the longest time, one of the sex myths many people believed in is that someone is a virgin if they haven’t experienced penetrative sex yet.

But “virginity” is subjective. Everyone can decide on what virginity means and how important it is for them.

3. Pills and Other Contraception Offer High Protection From STDs

One of the common sex myths is that contraceptives, particularly condoms, offer high protection against STDs.

The truth is, the only fool-proof way to prevent STD is abstinence from all kinds of sex. Even oral sex or using sex toys can lead to sexually-transmitted diseases.

For this reason, hygiene before and after sex, vaccination against HIV, getting tested for STDs, and having only one sexual partner are still indispensable aspects of protecting yourself against STDs.

4. Period Sex Prevents Pregnancy

One of the sex myths that still persist today is the belief that period sex prevents pregnancy.

The truth is, period sex doesn’t guarantee that a woman will not get pregnant: it depends largely on the menstrual cycle. If the sperm survives long enough until the period is over and the woman is fertile, pregnancy can still occur.

Also, certain positions, pulling out, and using a douche also do not prevent pregnancy.

5. Sex Without Penetration Cannot Get a Woman Pregnant

You must have heard of stories about women who allegedly got pregnant even when they didn’t engage in penetrative sex.

As little as the possibility is, experts say pregnancy without penetrative sex can still happen. As long as the sperm comes in contact with the vagina, the woman can conceive. This usually happens when the man ejaculates near the vagina or the erect penis comes in contact with the woman’s genital area.

6. Sex Without Orgasm Doesn’t Feel Good

Some people believe that the point of sex is to reach an orgasm (or multiple of them). But experts say sex should also be about physical and emotional intimacy; it can be good with or without orgasm.

However, if not having an orgasm worries you, don’t hesitate to talk to your partner or a sexual health expert.

7. Anal Sex is Only for Gay Couples

Sexual activities don’t rely on the couples’ sexual orientation. If a straight couple, for instance, wanted to engage in anal sex, they may do so. Likewise, if you’re interested in a particular activity or position, don’t hesitate to talk to your partner about it.

Did we miss anything? Share in the comments section to let others know about them.

Learn more about Sexual Wellness here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Sexual Health, https://chaw.fsu.edu/topics/sexual-health/myths-and-facts, Accessed November 17, 2021

Sex Myths, https://www.centreforsexuality.ca/sexual-health-info/sex-myths/, Accessed November 17, 2021

Sexual health: myths vs truths, https://www.health.qld.gov.au/news-events/news/sexual-health-myths-truths-fact-fiction-sti-protection-contraception, Accessed November 17, 2021

Myths and Facts About Sex, https://whps.sdes.ucf.edu/myths-and-facts-about-sex/, Accessed November 17, 2021

Can I get pregnant if I have sex without penetration?, https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/pregnancy/can-i-get-pregnant-if-i-have-sex-without-penetration/, Accessed November 17, 2021

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Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. Updated 2 weeks ago
Fact Checked by Kristel Lagorza