Vaccination Checklist for Kids: A Parent’s Guide

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Update Date 21/07/2020 . 4 mins read
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When it comes to your child’s health, vaccines are a top priority. Parents need to be aware of the list of vaccines for children by age, because this information can help them keep track of when their kids should head to their doctors.

How Do Vaccines Work?

When should children be vaccinated?

One question that parents often ask is how early should their children get vaccinated. The answer varies depending on what vaccine it is.

Babies can actually get vaccinated as soon as they are born, as this helps protect them against certain illnesses. Certain vaccines, however, should only be given once the child is older when their immune systems are stronger.

Ideally, your child should already have completed most of their vaccinations by the time they are six or seven years old. Getting vaccinated is very important at this point in their lives since their immune systems are still developing and cannot fully protect them from diseases.

List of Vaccines for Children by Age

Here is a list of vaccines as well as the corresponding ages that your child should get vaccinated.

At birth

The first dose of hepatitis B vaccines are given within 24 hours of birth. Children who have not been vaccinated for hepatitis B can get vaccinated at any time.

1-2 months

The second dose of hepatitis B vaccines are given within 1-2 months after birth. If your child was not vaccinated at birth, they can get the second dose 1-2 months after the first dose.

2 months

Babies can get their first dose of the following vaccines at 2 months:

  • Rotavirus or RV vaccine
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis or DTaP vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b or Hib
  • Pneumococcal conjugate or PCV13
  • Inactivated poliovirus or IPV

4 months

At 4 months, the second dose of the following vaccines can be given:

  • Rotavirus or RV vaccine
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis or DTaP vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b or Hib
  • Pneumococcal conjugate or PCV13
  • Inactivated poliovirus or IPV

6 months

At 6 months, the third dose of the following vaccines can be given:

  • Rotavirus or RV vaccine
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis or DTaP vaccine
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b or Hib
  • Pneumococcal conjugate or PCV13
  • Inactivated poliovirus or IPV.

During your child’s 6th to 15th month, the third dose of the IPV should be given.

At 6 months, your child can also get their annual flu vaccine.

12-15 months

At 12-15 months, the fourth dose of the following vaccines can be given:

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b or Hib
  • Pneumococcal conjugate or PCV13

Following the list of vaccines for children by age, the first dose of the following vaccines can also be given:

  • Measles, mumps, rubella or MMR
  • Varicella or VAR
  • Hepatitis A, with the second dose given 6 months after.

18 months

At 18 months, your child should receive their fourth dose of the DTaP vaccine as well as their annual flu vaccine.

4-6 years

At 4-6 years old, the following vaccines can be given:

  • 5th dose of DTaP vaccine
  • 4th dose of inactivated poliovirus or IPV vaccine
  • 2nd dose of MMR vaccine
  • 2nd dose of VAR vaccine

11-12 years

At 11-12 years, your child can be given the following vaccines:

  • HPV vaccine. This should be given to both boys and girls in order to prevent genital warts as well as certain types of cancer.
  • Tdap or tetanus, diptheria, and pertussis booster
  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine

Special Considerations

Some vaccines can be given earlier, depending on the child’s health as well as if they will be traveling.

Here are some special considerations:

  • The hepatitis A vaccine can be given at 6 months if the baby will be traveling to a place where hepatitis A is commonplace. Kids who have not yet been vaccinated for this when they were younger can also be vaccinated at any time for hepatitis A.
  • Babies who will be traveling internationally can be given the MMR vaccine as early as 6 months. If a child gets vaccinated this early, they should still get the other doses at 12-15 months and at 4-6 years.
  • From your child’s 6th month onwards, they should ideally be given the flu vaccine to help lower their risk of catching the flu. They need to be vaccinated yearly as flu strains vary each year.
  • Pneumococcal vaccines can be given to children who are older if they have conditions that affect their immune system.
  • Meningococcal vaccines can be given to babies as young as 8 weeks old, especially if they are at risk of meningitis. This also includes children with immune system disorders, as well as children who will be traveling to places where meningitis is common.

Aside from vaccinations, you can help boost your child’s immunity by ensuring that get enough rest and exercise and eat a healthy diet.

list of vaccines for children by age

Key Takeaways

It would be a good idea to keep track of all the vaccinations that your child has had. Ideally, you should be given a baby book that your child’s pediatrician will be filling out each time your child gets vaccinated.

It is also important to take note of any vaccinations that they get in school or in health centers so that you can stay on top of your child’s vaccinations.

It would also be a good idea to talk to your child’s pediatrician about creating a vaccine schedule to make sure that your child gets vaccinated at the right age. This can help strengthen their immune system and prevent them from catching serious illnesses as they age.

Learn more about Parenting here

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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