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How To Find the Whitening Soap for You

Medically reviewed by Martha Juco, MD · Aesthetics


Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. · Updated Jul 19, 2023

How To Find the Whitening Soap for You

There are numerous methods to whiten skin nowadays. All you have to do is step into the dermatology clinic, have your skin assessed by a board-certified dermatologist, and discuss with them what your skin goals are. They might recommend prescription creams or procedures like chemical peels, microdermabrasion, intravenous infusions, or laser treatment. However, many people would like to start with over-the-counter products such as soaps. Is there such a thing as “permanent skin whitening soap?” How do you choose a skin-lightening soap that best suits your skin? Find out here.

Is There Such a Thing as Permanent Skin Whitening Soap?

Ask a dermatologist and they’ll tell you that there’s no such thing as a “permanent skin whitening soap.”

Skin pigmentation or darkening, after all, happens due to various reasons, like sun exposure, hormonal changes, use of certain medicines, and irritation.  Even dermatology procedures require some level of maintenance (like going back after a couple of weeks). 

While there’s no permanent skin whitening soap, your best bet is to choose an appropriate product and adopt a skincare routine that suits you and doesn’t ruin the results you gained.  

Things To Look For in a Whitening Soap

There may be no permanent skin whitening soap, but you can still choose a product that best suits your skin using these guidelines: 

1. Look for Safe and Effective Ingredients 

When you’re shopping for a whitening soap, the most important thing to do is to check for certifications. These certifications ensure that the product you are buying has been tested and proven safe for human use. It also means that there are no harmful ingredients in your soap, which is something you need to be aware of when choosing any brand. 

One ingredient that you must be wary of is mercury as exposure to this element can lead to serious health problems. 

A note on safety

Be careful with brands that do not list chemicals on their package, such as simply saying “foaming agent” or “fragrance” rather than listing out exactly what they contain.

Common Skin Lightening Ingredients

If you’re looking to address skin pigmentation or dark spots, products containing these ingredients might help:

Most skin lightening ingredients can be quite irritating. Be careful when using whitening soaps near sensitive areas like the groin.

2. Read Reviews (And Not Just on the Product Page)

It’s important to look for reviews from people with similar skin types and who have used the product for a long time. It’s also a good idea to consider their gender, age, and ethnicity. 

Instead of just reading reviews on the product page alone, try to read about the soap on social media sites and forums. Reviews on these pages are often more detailed than those found on product pages. 

3. Keep the Price in Mind

When you’re looking for a whitening soap, it’s important to keep the price in mind.

It can be tempting to go with the cheapest product on the shelf, but this might not always be your best bet. Some products may have lower prices because they don’t contain as many active ingredients as others do — or because they don’t work as well. A product may also be cheap because it didn’t undergo the necessary testing to determine its safety. 

Key Takeaways

If you are looking for a “permanent skin whitening soap,” you might be disappointed as there’s no such thing. Still, it is important to understand what makes one product better than another. You will want to consider what your skin needs, your budget, and how effective it will be at improving your complexion with regular use. There are many factors that go into choosing the right product so make sure you consider them all before making any decisions. This is why it’s still best to visit your dermatologist for any skincare needs.

Learn more about Skincare and Cleansing here

Disclaimer

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Medically reviewed by

Martha Juco, MD

Aesthetics


Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. · Updated Jul 19, 2023

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