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What Can I Use Instead of Lube? Here Are Some Safe Alternatives

What Can I Use Instead of Lube? Here Are Some Safe Alternatives

A lot of people know that using lubricant during sex can make it more pleasurable and comfortable. But not everyone has some lube readily available, which begs the question, “What can I use instead of lube?” “Can baby oil be used as lubricant?” And are there other safe and effective alternatives?

Read on to learn more about what to use instead of lube, and which ones to avoid.

What Can I Use Instead of Lube?

Lubrication is important during sex. If there’s not enough lubrication, sex can be painful, and if you’re using a condom, it can cause the condom to break.

However, there are situations where you might not have lubricant available, and you still want to have sex. Here are some safe and effective options that you can use:

Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is not just used for sunburns or moisturizing skin, it can also be used as a lubricant as well!

It has a great consistency which makes it good to use as a lubricant, and it’s readily available. You might even have some at home right now.

It’s very safe to use, and it’s also water-based, so there’s no risk of causing any damage to a condom. It also helps hydrate skin, which can make sex feel much better.

However, be sure to check if there are any harmful substances in the aloe vera you’re using. Some might contain alcohol and other substances, which are safe for skin, but can cause irritation or even pain to genitals.

Yogurt

Surprisingly, yogurt is also an effective alternative to lubricants. It might feel weird, but yogurt fits the bill for an effective lubricant. This is because it’s water-based, it’s safe for the body, and it can actually have some anti-bacterial properties.

Yogurt is also cheap and readily available, so it’s not too hard to find.

Olive Oil

Olive oil is another safe alternative to use as a lubricant. Because it’s a type of vegetable oil, it’s all-natural and doesn’t cause any harm to your skin.

In fact, it can even help soften and moisturize skin, which reduces irritation and inflammation. Because it’s a type of oil, it’s also a great lubricant, and can help make sex feel much more pleasurable.

However, one caveat with using olive oil is that you can’t use latex-based condoms with it. This is because it can weaken latex condoms, and cause them to break. Oil-based lubricants are also associated with higher rates of infection. For these reasons, medical professionals recommend water-based lubricants instead.

Virgin Coconut Oil

Just like olive oil, virgin coconut oil is another safe alternative that you can use as a lubricant. Virgin coconut oil has moisturizing properties as well, so it helps reduce irritation when you’re having sex.

But just like olive oil and other oil-based lubricants, virgin coconut oil has the same risks when it comes to condom breakage and risk of infection. You should use a water-based lubricant if you’re using any latex condoms. If using an oil-based based lubricant, use polyurethane condoms instead, as these don’t degrade break with oil.

What Should You Avoid?

While these products do provide some lubrication, they can also cause harm and irritation to your genitals. So it’s best to not use these products as a substitute for lube:

Baby Oil

Baby oil might seem like a good replacement for lube. But in reality, it can do more harm than good. It’s possible that baby oil can irritate the skin, and it can also break condoms made of latex rubber.

Vaseline

Vaseline does work as a lubricant, but it carries with it a high risk of infection. In particular, studies have found that using vaseline as a lubricant during sex can increase the risk of bacterial vaginosis.

Aside from this, it is also an oil-based lubricant, which is a no-no when using latex condoms.

Spit

Spit might initially sound like a good substitute for lube, since it’s used during oral sex. But that’s actually not a good idea because spit can contain bacteria that increases the risk of STDs.

So it would be best to avoid using it as a lubricant as much as possible.

Learn more about Sex Tips here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

The Comparison of Vaginal Cream of Mixing Yogurt, Honey and Clotrimazole on Symptoms of Vaginal Candidiasis, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4803919/, Accessed February 18, 2021

When sex gives more pain than pleasure – Harvard Health, https://www.health.harvard.edu/pain/when-sex-gives-more-pain-than-pleasure, Accessed February 18, 2021

Saliva use as a lubricant for anal sex is a risk factor for rectal gonorrhoea among men who have sex with men, a new public health message: a cross-sectional survey | Sexually Transmitted Infections, https://sti.bmj.com/content/92/7/532, Accessed February 18, 2021

The Effect of Aloe Vera Clinical Trials on Prevention and Healing of Skin Wound: A Systematic Review, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330525/, Accessed February 18, 2021

Dangerous Household Hydrocarbons, https://www.poison.org/articles/2012-feb/dangerous-household-hydrocarbons, Accessed February 18, 2021

In vitro anti-inflammatory and skin protective properties of Virgin coconut oil, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335493/, Accessed February 18, 2021

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Written by Jan Alwyn Batara Updated Jun 17
Medically reviewed by Jobelle Ann Dela Cruz Bigalbal, M.D.
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