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Myths and Facts About Vagina Lock (Vaginismus)

Myths and Facts About Vagina Lock (Vaginismus)

You may have heard of stories about men and women getting stuck together due to a “vagina lock” problem, which many people believe happens due to vaginismus. But will vaginismus really cause penis captivus, a situation when the penis becomes stuck in the vagina during penetrative sex? In this article, we will look into the answer, and debunk myths about vaginismus.

Myth #1 – If a Woman Has Vaginismus, Penis Captivus Happens

The first myth we have to dispel is the belief that penis captivus always happens when a woman has vaginismus.

Fact: Penis captivus may occur when a woman experiences vaginismus, but cases of a man and a woman getting stuck together are so rare that most doctors only know about them through anecdotal reports¹ ².

They explained that an engorged penis may get stuck due to vagina lock, which may occur during an orgasm, when vaginal muscles contract. If it does occur, however, they believe it to be temporary. Eventually, the vaginal walls will relax and the penis loses some of the blood that made it erect, making it smaller.

Penis captivus is not one of the main manifestations of vaginismus. Generally, vaginismus makes it difficult for the woman to insert anything (even a tampon) in the vagina. But vaginismus can cause painful sexual intercourse.

Myth #2 – Vaginismus Is “All in the Mind”

One of the vagina lock myths some people still believe in is that vaginismus is all in the mind. In other words, the woman can very well force her vaginal walls to relax.

Fact: Vaginismus involves involuntary spasms (contractions) of the musculature of the vagina. As much as women don’t want it to happen, they cannot control it.

And while fear of sex may contribute to the occurrence of vagina lock, there are many other factors to consider, such as anxiety disorders, vaginal tears, previous surgeries, and other conditions, such as urinary tract infections and yeast infection.

It’s not just women who are apprehensive about sex who experience vaginismus either. A woman who previously enjoyed sex may find themselves experiencing vaginismus, too.

Myth #3 – Vaginismus Occurs Due to Sexual Abuse or Because the Woman DOES NOT Like Sex

Because vaginismus can be associated with fear of sex or negative emotions about intercourse, some people think that sexual abuse or aversion to intercourse causes vaginismus.

Fact: Sexual abuse and fear of sex can be contributing factors, but they are not the main triggers.

Believing that vagina lock occurs due to sexual abuse may be detrimental to women who are not abused. They might feel misunderstood, confused, or worse, dismissed.

Likewise, many women who experience vaginismus desire to have pleasurable sex with their partner.

Myth #4 – Vagina Lock Will Go Away in Time; It Doesn’t Need Treatment

Because many people believe that vaginismus is “all in the mind,” some tend to believe that it does not need treatment.

Fact: Vaginismus is treatable. Women with vaginismus need not force themselves to abstain or bear the pain and discomfort during sexual intercourse.

Treatment for vagina lock may involve topical medicines, such as lidocaine, to ease the pain. Many experts also recommend therapies, like pelvic floor therapy, cognitive behavioral (talk) therapy, and sex therapy. Of course, relaxation techniques also count.

Key Takeaway

A vagina lock problem or vaginismus may or may not manifest into a situation called penis captivus. The main symptoms of this condition include painful sexual intercourse and difficulty inserting anything (including a tampon or a penis) in the vagina.

If you have these symptoms, the best thing to do is to consult a doctor. Don’t fall for myths that say it’s all in your mind and you don’t need to treat it. Vaginismus is treatable, and the sooner you get the treatment, the better.

Learn more about Sexual Wellness here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. Updated 2 weeks ago
Fact Checked by Cesar Beltran