Getting Ready for the End of Maternity Leave

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Update Date 11/09/2020 . 4 mins read
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After giving birth, a working mother in the Philippines has the right to apply for 105 days of maternity leave either if she’s working for a government or a private institution. This may feel like a long time, but when you’re taking care of a newborn, days will go by so fast. If you’re nearing the end of your recovery period, you might want to start thinking about how to prepare for the end of maternity leave. Here’s what you need to know.

Maternity Leave in the Philippines: What You Need to Know

What is Maternity Leave?

Maternity leave is a grant given by a company to its female employees who just had given birth. In the Philippines, the Republic Act No. 11210 or the 105-Day Expanded Maternity Leave Law was approved to give additional days to qualified employees for them to recover and take care of their newborn.

Working pregnant women can apply for this grant, preferably 30 days before her delivery date. The maternity leave gives 105 days of paid leave to eligible staff as well as an additional 15  days for workers who are a solo parent.

In addition, female workers can also request for an additional 30 days leave without pay if ever they need more time to recuperate. All they need to do is to inform their employer, in black and white, 45 days before their maternity leave ends.

Preparing for Work After Maternity Leave

Going back to work after about 3 months of rest can be emotional, exciting, nerve-wracking, and overwhelming. To have a successful transition, you must be open to the fact that there will be a lot of changes you need to go through since you’re not just a full-time employee, but a full-time mom as well.

That is why it is best if you plan ahead, instead of cramming a day before going back to work. Preparing yourself and your baby a week or two before going back to work will not just help you enjoy the last bits of your downtime, but it can also ease your stress and worries.

how to prepare for the end of maternity leave

What to do

Here are some tips on how to prepare for the end of maternity leave and be ready to get back to work.

Don’t be too hard on yourself

There are a lot of new challenges you need to face once you get back to work. That is why it is best if you don’t stress yourself too much as it can negatively affect your productivity and motivation once you return to duty.

Take things little by little, don’t overthink, and don’t overwhelm yourself with all the tasks you need to accomplish. It can be tough to leave your little one at home, but just remember that you’re doing what’s best for their future.

Be in touch with your boss and office mates

Since you’ve been away for quite some time, it is best if you catch up on new updates about the workforce from your office buddies or boss. This will help you adjust, if ever there are changes, to prevent you from experiencing culture shock.

Another tip is to ask your employer for a quick rundown of tasks you need to do on your first workday, so you won’t be astounded by the workload.

Prepare for pumping breast milk at work

If you are breastfeeding, you must prepare all the equipment you need for breast milk pumping. If you are exclusively breastfeeding while on your maternity leave, then it will be easier for you if you start training your baby with bottle feeding and hone your skills in pumping. If you are weaning your baby from breastmilk, you can start checking which formula milk is best for them. They may need time to adjust to different formulas.

Prior to you returning to work, it is also a great time to ask your HR for a designated lactation area where you can comfortably pump breast milk for your baby.

New Mom’s Guide to Breast Milk Pumping and Storage

 Do a dry run

Being away from your child for a couple of hours in a day is emotionally stressful, especially if you have developed a strong bond with your child. But, for you and your baby to get used to this kind of setting, doing a dry run can help.

Practice leaving your baby at home with your husband or a sitter for a couple of hours before your return to the office. Doing this for a couple of times will teach your baby that you’ll be gone for quite some time, but you’ll be back soon after. This will also help you realize that spending hours away from home can also help with your mental and emotional state.

Ask for support

Now that you’re going back to work, it’ll be quite hard to maintain the household. To make your life a little easier, you can ask your partner to do household chores while you take care of the baby once you get home from work or vice versa.

But in cases where both you and your partner are working outside, then it’s best if you ask a family member or look for a sitter who can take care of your baby while you’re at work.

Prepare yourself mentally and physically

You might be emotional at times when you think about going back to work and leaving your baby at home, and that is normal. To ease your longing and worry, you can set up a check-in time to talk to your sitter on how your baby is doing.

For you to be physically ready, you should start eating healthier foods, taking vitamins, and working out to strengthen your body and your immune system.

Key Takeaways

Going back to work after spending months and developing a bond with your little one can be admittedly hard to do. You can make it easier by making sure that your baby has all they need when you’re away. Knowing that your little one is safe and sound and taken care of will help you find solace even while in the workplace. And this is the very reason why every working mom should know how to prepare for the end of maternity leave.

Learn more about Parenting, here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Maternity Leave in the Philippines: What You Need to Know

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