What are your concerns?

close
Inaccurate
Hard to understand
Other

Or copy link

New

How to Squirt: Everything You Need to Know About ‘Squirting'

How to Squirt: Everything You Need to Know About ‘Squirting'

Squirting is a very contentious topic. Even the studies done on squirting, or ‘female ejaculation,’ can be conflicting. That’s why we’re here to clear the air and try to make sense of what really happens when a woman ‘squirts’. We’ll also talk about how to squirt, so you can try and see for yourself if it’s something you might be interested in.

What is squirting?

First off, we first need to know what exactly squirting is. Squirting, also known as female ejaculation, is a release of fluid that happens during a woman’s orgasm. Just as men ejaculate when they reach climax, some women ‘squirt’ or release fluid from their vagina.

What this fluid is exactly, and what causes it to happen has been a topic of debate for some time.

There are two main camps when it comes to squirting: the first camp believes that squirting is nothing more than urine coming from the vagina. There have been studies done on squirting, and the results claim that what is happening isn’t ejaculation, but more of involuntary urination. The medical term for this is “coital stress incontinence” and it is an actual thing that happens to some women1.

However, there are also other studies that claim female ejaculation is an actual phenomenon. The results of these studies say that the fluid actually comes from the paraurethral or periurethral glands, also known as Skene’s glands. These glands are found near a woman’s urethra, and are essentially the counterpart to a man’s prostate glands2. However, not all women were found to have these glands.

What’s in the fluid?

Studying the fluid itself also produced conflicting claims. Some studies have found that the fluid is indistinguishable from urine. Other studies found a distinct difference between female ejaculate and urine and that it was similar to fluid that comes from the prostate.

Based on the most recent studies, however, there is enough evidence to suggest that female ejaculation is real. However, the function of the ejaculate and why not all women experience it is something that needs to be further studied.

There have been some hurdles in studying female ejaculation

One of the biggest problems with the study of female ejaculation is that some scientists are too quick to dismiss the phenomenon. A lot of women who have experienced squirting claim that it feels nothing at all like urinating3.

Yet, there are still scientists and doctors who believe that it is not an actual phenomenon. This is why the topic of squirting is surprisingly complicated and entangled in issues of female sexuality.

How to squirt: Can everyone do it?

Now that we’ve established squirting is an actual thing, can you learn how to squirt?

According to one study done in 2017, it was found that about 70% of women experienced ejaculation. Though, other studies have claimed numbers that vary from 10%-50%. There have also been cases wherein the ejaculate went back into the bladder, so there wasn’t any visible or evident ‘squirting’ even if the woman ejaculates.

Knowing how to squirt is actually something that’s difficult to do. The prevailing thought is that it just happens to some women, and not to others.

Another factor that makes it difficult to learn how to squirt is that not all women have Skene’s glands. Hence these glands are also considered vestigial or rudimentary parts. If you don’t have this gland, then chances are, you might not be able to ejaculate.

However, not having these glands doesn’t mean that sex or orgasms are less pleasurable. Numerous women have had great sex lives even without being able to squirt.

Knowing how to squirt is just one of those things that people know innately and happens to them naturally. Consult your doctor for any other questions about sex, female ejaculation, and other relevant concerns.

Learn other Sex Tips here.

Ovulation Calculator

Ovulation Calculator

Tracking your period cycle, determines your most fertile days and increases your chance of conceiving or applying for birth control.

Ovulation Calculator

Tracking your period cycle, determines your most fertile days and increases your chance of conceiving or applying for birth control.

Ovulation Calculator

Cycle Length

(days)

28

Period Duration

(days)

7

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources
  1. Female ejaculation: An update on anatomy, history, and controversies, https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ca.23654, Accessed December 6, 2021
  2. The Urethrovaginal Gland, Amrita & Amritasis: Cultural and Medical Background, http://www.jscholaronline.org/articles/JWHG/The-Urethrovaginal.pdf, Accessed December 6, 2021
  3. Why Censor Female Ejaculation? Tensions in the Taxonomy of Female Pleasure, https://www.omorashi.org/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=118701, Accessed December 6, 2021
  4. Do women ejaculate? – ISSM, https://www.issm.info/sexual-health-qa/do-women-ejaculate/, Accessed December 6, 2021
  5. Can Women Ejaculate? That Depends on Whom You Ask. | Office for Science and Society – McGill University, https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/health-history/can-women-ejaculate-depends-who-you-ask, Accessed December 6, 2021
Picture of the authorbadge
Written by Jan Alwyn Batara Updated May 11
Medically reviewed by Regina Victoria Boyles, MD