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Are Mosquito Patches Safe For Babies?

Are Mosquito Patches Safe For Babies?

While harmless mosquito bites only lead to mild itching that parents can treat at home, we cannot discount the fact that some result in serious conditions such as dengue and malaria. This is perhaps why the idea of cute mosquito patches appeals to moms and dads. But are mosquito patches safe for babies? Are they effective? Find out here.

Mosquito Patches, an Overview

Before we answer the question: Are mosquito patches safe for babies?, let’s first clarify a few things.

The first one being the instructions for mosquito patches vary.

You might be familiar with the cute patches that you need to stick to your children’s clothes. We also have the actual skin patches, which we stick directly to our skin.

are mosquito patches safe for babies

But for babies, you usually stick the patches in their crib, stroller, or any surface near them. Never place anything on your baby’s skin unless approved by their pediatrician.

Another bit of information worth noting is that mosquito patches contain different ingredients. Those for babies and kids most likely have natural ingredients such as citronella, a known repellent. On the other hand, skin patches probably contain vitamin B1.

Are Mosquito Patches Safe for Babies?

Answering this question is quite tricky, seeing that there are very few references focusing on mosquito patches for babies (the ones parents need to stick to their crib or stroller).

Baby patches sold by reputable manufacturers are probably safe for babies as long as you use them accordingly; that is, they wouldn’t be able to reach for it and then put it accidentally in their mouth or eyes.

As for their effectiveness, we’ll need more studies.

Mosquito Skin Patches Are Probably Ineffective, Studies Find

Are mosquito patches safe for babies? Yes, however, whether they are effective, that’s another matter. Vitamin B1 patches supposedly work by saturating the skin with B1, making them more “unattractive” to mosquitoes.

In one study1, the researchers discovered that B1 patch had no effect on two Aedes mosquito species known to spread the dengue virus (Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus)

Another investigation2 also tested a skin patch brand against the same species of mosquito, and it, too, revealed that the patch had no repellent effects.

7 Common Baby Skin Rashes and How to Treat Them at Home

How Can You Protect Your Baby From Mosquitoes?

Since we still don’t have a definite answer to the question are mosquito patches safe and effective, experts remind parents to practice the following preventive measures:

  • Make your baby wear light-colored clothing that covers up to their wrist and ankles. This is because mosquitoes are attracted to dark colors. Practice this when you spend time outdoors, especially in areas where there are mosquitoes.
  • Get rid of still waters in and outside your home. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in still waters. Another useful tip in connection to this is to not overwater garden plants.
  • If you have trees around your home, check for holes. Fill them with mortar or sand.
  • Use screens on doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out.

Safe Repellents for Children

If you believe that your baby needs repellent, talk to their doctor. As mentioned earlier, do not apply any product on their skin without their pediatrician’s approval

Currently, there are several safe repellents for kids3. Your options include:

  • Chemical repellents containing diethyltoluamide or DEET, which is the best defense against biting insects. However, you need to follow precautions for these products. Never apply DEET products on babies younger than 2 months old and always choose those with concentrations lower than 30%.
  • Repellents made from essential oils. Use this only after a doctor’s recommendation.
  • Chemical repellents with permethrin, which can only be applied to clothing.

Mosquito Bite Rashes in Kids: When Should Parents Worry?

Key Takeaways

So, are mosquito patches safe for babies?

They are in some instances safe, as long as you use them as instructed. But if you’ll ask if experts recommend them, the answer is no. In fact, most health institutions don’t even include them in their list of effective repellents.

The best way to protect your baby from mosquito bites is to take care of their surroundings and clothing. If you want to apply repellents on them, be sure to talk to their doctor first.

Learn more about Baby Care here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

1) The Efficacy of Some Commercially Available Insect Repellents for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae)
https://academic.oup.com/jinsectscience/article/15/1/140/2583458
Accessed March 2, 2021

2) Researchers compare ‘natural’ mosquito repellents to DEET
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151029101456.htm
Accessed March 2, 2021

3) Choosing an Insect Repellent for Your Child
https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Insect-Repellents.aspx
Accessed March 2, 2021

4) Insect repellents – guidelines for safe use
https://www.rch.org.au/kidsinfo/fact_sheets/Insect_repellents_guidelines_for_safe_use/
Accessed March 2, 2021

5) Prevent Mosquito Bites
https://www.cdc.gov/mosquitoes/mosquito-bites/prevent-mosquito-bites.html
Accessed March 2, 2021

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Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. Updated Jun 09
Medically reviewed by Ruben Macapinlac, MD, DPPS
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