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Can Random Blood Sugar Testing Determine If You Have Diabetes?

    Can Random Blood Sugar Testing Determine If You Have Diabetes?

    If you have diabetes, a random blood sugar test may be recommended from time to time. This test involves taking a small sample of blood to measure your glucose levels at random times – regardless of your meal consumptions. If you’ve looked up the term “RBS meaning,” this article will be helpful.

    What is Random Blood Sugar?

    Random Blood Sugar or RBS testing, as the name suggests, tests for blood glucose levels at any given moment. Unlike Fasting Blood Sugar or FBS test where the patient needs to fast for about 8 hours, RBS can be done even after meals. Note that RBS and FBS results reflect the blood glucose level at the time of testing.

    Risks to Having A Random Blood Sugar Test

    When you search for the term “RBS meaning,” you probably also wonder about its risks. The test is quite simple, although a little invasive as it often requires finger pricking to get the blood sample. The risk of getting hurt by the needle used during this procedure is very low, but it may sting at first. Other than that, the test is quick, safe, and accurate so long as you have a working glucometer and strip and you use them correctly.

    What Happens During a Random Blood Sugar Test?

    A random blood sugar test is a simple and inexpensive method of monitoring your blood glucose levels. As hinted earlier, you can do an RBS test at home with a finger prick and portable glucose meter, or in the doctor’s office as a part of other blood tests.

    After pricking the finger, you need to put a drop of blood on the test strip inserted in the glucometer. The results will automatically pop up

    Normal results depend on the last time you ate. If you did the test soon after having a meal, you can expect a higher result. But, generally, up to 125 mg/dl is considered normal. A result of 200 mg/dl might be indicative of diabetes.

    RBS Testing is an Important Test for People with Diabetes

    If you search the term “RBS meaning,” you’ll find that a Random Blood Sugar test is a simple way to find out if you have diabetes. While it is not the preferred method, as doctors in the country mostly use two separate Fasting Blood Sugar tests (or HbA1c test, if available) to diagnose diabetes, it is still a diagnostic tool.

    In other words, for people who don’t know if they have diabetes, this procedure can help determine whether or not they do. However, for those who already know about their condition they might only resort to this test if they experience symptoms related to their diabetes mellitus, such as:

    • Unintentional weight gain
    • Increased urination
    • Confusion or a sudden change on how the patient talks or behaves
    • Fainting
    • Blurred vision
    • Seizure (first-time)
    • Unconsciousness

    Hence, if you notice these symptoms, it’s best to get your glucometer and check your blood sugar ASAP. Better yet, talk to your loved ones or people living with you and ask them to check your blood sugar if these symptoms occur.

    Key Takeaways

    RBS means Random Blood Sugar. It means testing for blood glucose levels at any given time regardless of food consumption. If you don’t know if you have diabetes, this test can help screen if you have it. However, note that there are other diagnostic tools preferred by physicians, such as HbA1c or glycosylated hemoglobin testing and Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS) testing. If you have already determined that you have diabetes, the doctor will most likely only advise you to do RBS testing when untoward symptoms occur.

    Learn more about Diabetes here.


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    Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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    Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. Updated Jul 27
    Fact Checked by Kristel Lagorza
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