Baby Ear Piercing Tips: The Do's And Don'ts

    Baby Ear Piercing Tips: The Do's And Don'ts

    Do you know any baby ear piercing tips? There’s just something so adorable about babies with dainty earrings. Some parents do it for aesthetic value, while others for tradition. Either way, it’s cute.

    Now, there has always been a debate whether it’s more ideal to have your child’s ears pierced shortly after birth, or to wait until they’re older. Some would even argue that the younger you are, the less it would hurt.

    But is there really a right time to have your baby’s ears pierced? Read on to learn baby ear piercing tips, as well as pre- and post-care dos and don’ts.

    How old should your baby be before getting their ears pierced?

    There’s really no right or wrong answer in terms of the “appropriate” age. Although, one baby ear piercing tip – which most doctors would agree on – is to have your child get some of their vaccinations first, specifically Anti-Tetanus vaccine. This is to strengthen their immune system in case of infection.

    Moreover, as long as the procedure is done using sterile equipment and professional techniques, your baby should be fine. And as the parent, it’s your responsibility to prioritize proper aftercare to aid faster healing.

    Are there possible risks?

    Infection is most likely to occur if the equipment used were not sanitized, and was not even safe to use to begin with.

    Your baby might also have an allergic reaction to the metal, so make sure that a gold post earring is inserted, apart from the actual earring, as this device will help reduce inflammation and allergic reaction.

    Another baby ear piercing tip: Avoid dangling earrings so as not to get them caught on clothing and risk your baby’s earlobe tearing.

    What to check for during the ear-piercing process?

    For the safety of your baby, always choose a doctor to perform the piercing as they know the solution for the possible risks and complications. In addition, avoid those who use a piercing gun instead of a sterile needle. While common, it can be difficult to sterilize a piercing gun since it can’t be exposed to high temperatures that long.

    A hypodermic needle, on the other hand, is safer and sharper. Piercing guns rely more on pressure instead of the sharpness of the post.

    During the process, the doctor or technician should:

    • Wash hands before and after procedure
    • Use vinyl gloves
    • Apply antiseptic solution to clean your baby’s earlobe before piercing
    • Provide a prescription numbing cream to alleviate any discomfort

    What are some aftercare baby ear-piercing tips?

    Initial healing takes about six weeks. After, you’re allowed to replace it with a new pair, so as long as you do it within the first six months after the piercing. If the holes go on without jewelry for a long period of time, they will eventually close on their own.

    Taking good care of your baby’s newly pierced ears can aid a quicker healing process and reduce the risk for infection.

    Here are some tips:

    • Only touch the pierced area with clean hands. Refrain from touching them at all. If you do, make sure you’ve thoroughly washed your hands first.
    • Clean the area, front and back, using soap and water only, at least twice a day. Avoid using alcohol as even it can delay wound healing.
    • Twist the earring, at least twice each day, to avoid the studs from sticking to the healing hole.
    • Always check if the earrings are firmly locked. Loose ones might get caught on clothes causing earlobe tearing or become a choking hazard.

    In case you notice any swelling, redness around your child’s ears, this might indicate an infection. Seek professional help immediately.

    Once you’ve finally decided to have your child’s ears pierced, always go to a professional to get the job done or your doctor. After, follow aftercare instructions to help speed up the healing.

    Learn other tips about Child Skincare here.

    Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

    Medically reviewed by

    Ruben Macapinlac, MD, DPPS

    Pediatrics · Philippine Pediatric Society


    Written by Honey Buenaventura · Updated Sep 06, 2022

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