Griseofulvin

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Update Date 08/05/2020 . 6 mins read
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Know the basics

What is griseofulvin used for?

Griseofulvin is an antifungal medication that fights infections caused by fungus.

Griseofulvin is used to treat infections such as ringworm, athlete’s foot, jock itch, and fungal infections of the scalp, fingernails, or toenails.

Griseofulvin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

How should I take griseofulvin?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

To make swallowing easier, you may crush the Gris-PEG tablet and sprinkle the medicine into a spoonful of applesauce. Swallow right away without chewing. Do not save the mixture for later use.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. It may take up several weeks before your symptoms improve. Nail infections can take several months to clear completely.

Griseofulvin will not treat a bacterial or fungal infection, or a viral infection such as the flu or a common cold.

If you use this medicine long-term, you may need frequent medical tests at your doctor’s office.

How do I store griseofulvin?

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Do not freeze. Different brands of this medication may have different storage needs. Check the product package for instructions on how to store your brand, or ask your pharmacist. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Know the precautions & warnings

What should I know before using griseofulvin?

Before taking griseofulvin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to griseofulvin, or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin), oral contraceptives, cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), phenobarbital (Luminal), and vitamins.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver disease, porphyria, lupus, or a history of alcohol abuse.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking griseofulvin, call your doctor.
  • tell your doctor if you drink alcohol.
  • you should plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Griseofulvin may make your skin sensitive to sunlight

Is it safe to take griseofulvin during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

This medication is pregnancy risk category X. (A=No risk, B=No risk in some studies, C=There may be some risk, D=Positive evidence of risk, X=Contraindicated, N=Unknown) There is sufficient evidence to suggest that griseofulvin can cause birth defects and fetal harm. Women who are required to take this drug are advised to use contraception up to one month after  stopping griseofulvin use. Men who are taking this drug are also advised to wait at least 6 months after stopping griseofulvin use before attempting to father a child.

There are no adequate studies in women for determining infant risk when using this medication during breastfeeding. Weigh the potential benefits against the potential risks before taking this medication while breastfeeding.

Know the side effects

What are the side effects of griseofulvin?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • fever, chills, flu symptoms;
  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
  • confusion, trouble with daily activities;
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • severe skin reaction — fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling;

Less serious side effects may include:

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);
  • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea;
  • headache, dizziness, feeling tired;;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • confusion;
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet; or
  • menstrual irregularities.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Know the interactions

What drugs may interact with griseofulvin?

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Desogestrel
  • Dienogest
  • Drospirenone
  • Estradiol Cypionate
  • Estradiol Valerate
  • Ethinyl Estradiol
  • Ethynodiol Diacetate
  • Etonogestrel
  • Levonorgestrel
  • Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
  • Mestranol
  • Norelgestromin
  • Norethindrone
  • Norgestimate
  • Norgestrel
  • Phenobarbital
  • Warfarin

Does food or alcohol interact with griseofulvin?

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following is usually not recommended, but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use this medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Ethanol

What health conditions may interact with griseofulvin?

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Actinomycosis (bacterial infection) or
  • Blastomycosis (Gilchrist’s disease) or
  • Candidiasis (yeast infection) or
  • Histoplasmosis (Darling’s disease) or
  • Other infections (e.g., bacteria) or
  • Sporotrichosis (Rose gardener’s disease) or
  • Tinea versicolor (Tinea flava)—Griseofulvin will not work in patients with these conditions.
  • Liver failure or
  • Porphyria (enzyme problem)—Should not be used in patients with these conditions.
  • Lupus erythematosus or lupus-like diseases—Use with caution. May make this condition worse.

Understand the dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this medication.

What is the dose of Griseofulvin for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis – Fingernail: Microsize formulation: 1000 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 660 to 750 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Onychomycosis – Toenail: Microsize formulation: 1000 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 660 to 750 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Pedis: Microsize formulation: 1000 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 660 to 750 mg/day orally in 2 to 4 divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Barbae: Microsize formulation: 500 mg/day orally in single or 2 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 330 to 375 mg/day orally in single or divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Capitis: Microsize formulation: 500 mg/day orally in single or 2 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 330 to 375 mg/day orally in single or divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Corporis: Microsize formulation: 500 mg/day orally in single or 2 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 330 to 375 mg/day orally in single or divided doses

Usual Adult Dose for Tinea Cruris: Microsize formulation: 500 mg/day orally in single or 2 divided doses

Ultramicrosize formulation: 330 to 375 mg/day orally in single or divided doses

What is the dose of Griseofulvin for a child?

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dermatophytosis

Microsize formulation:

1 year or older: 10 to 20 mg/kg/day orally in single or divided doses, not to exceed 1000 mg/day

Ultramicrosize formulation:

2 years or younger: Dosage has not been established.

Greater than 2 years: 5 to 15 mg/kg/day in single or divided doses, not to exceed 750 mg/day

What dosage form does Griseofulvin come in?

Suspension, Oral: 125 mg/5mL (118 mL, 120 mL)

Tablet, Oral: 125 mg, 250 mg, 500 mg

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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