Sex Health Questions We Are Too Embarrassed to Ask

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Update Date 08/06/2020 . 4 mins read
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Do a quick search on Google on euphemisms for sexual intercourse, and you will get hundreds of suggestions. From the very innocent “making love” to hilarious ones like “bumping uglies,” the terms for sex are diverse. The extensive vocabulary surrounding this topic is a reflection of social attitudes about it. While society is shedding some of its conservative views on sex, there remains a perception that it is not a proper topic to be discussed in a public setting. Many of us want to know more information about sex and have many sex health questions we are too embarrassed to ask. 

These social considerations are part of the reason why some individuals are apprehensive about discussing sexual issues with even medical professionals. It is necessary to overcome such limiting beliefs and behaviors to get proper advice on dealing with these sexual issues.

What are some common sexual health topics that people are too embarrassed to discuss? 

Erectile dysfunction

Men sometimes experience difficulty in getting and maintaining an erection during intercourse. Experts point to a combination of physical and emotional issues as the cause. Men who have medical conditions that affect their nerves and blood vessels are more prone to erectile dysfunction. Unhealthy lifestyle habits such as getting little to no exercise, and smoking may also affect performance. In other cases, mental and emotional issues such as stress, anxiety, and depression are also possible culprits. Older men are also more likely to experience this condition since their blood vessels have narrowed.

Premature ejaculation

Another common sexual problem for men involves finishing too quickly during intercourse, which leads to dissatisfaction and embarrassment. Again, there is hesitation among men to admit to such an experience. Studies vary in their findings on how many men are affected by this condition. Doctors link over-the-counter cold medicine, underlying medical problems like urinary tract infection, stress, or a simple lack of sexual experience to this issue.

Unusual vaginal smell 

Vaginas have a smell, and it differs from one woman to another, depending on a lot of factors like menstrual cycle and hygiene habits. But the truth is, it does not smell like flowers. Vaginas are home to billions of bacteria. The bacterial balance in our genitals changes daily and even on an hourly basis. Also, the female genitals have sweat glands that cause subtle shifts in vaginal scent. 

See a doctor if any of the following occurs:

  • Itching or burning
  • Pain
  • Pain during sex
  • Thick cottage cheese-like discharge
  • Strong fishy smell
  • Vaginal bleeding unrelated to period

If you experience vaginal odor, you can try the following.

Sex health questions we are too embarrassed to ask

Sex after pregnancy

Given the physical and emotional rigors of delivering and caring for an infant, sex may not be the priority of new parents. But once they settle into their new normal, the partners may seek to be again sexually intimate. Many couples admit that sex after pregnancy is “one of the sex health questions we are too embarrassed to ask.”

Experts recommend at least six weeks for a woman’s body to recover from the physical toll of childbirth. Pregnancy and delivery will cause specific changes to a woman’s body and mood. Therefore, sexual experience at the beginning will not be the same as before the baby.

Masturbation

There was a time when pleasuring oneself was considered taboo and even a mental health issue. Nowadays, people have generally accepted this as normal and natural. According to some reports, nine in 10 individuals engage in masturbation. And even those in relationships still do the act. Masturbation is a safe alternative to those wishing to avoid pregnancy and venereal diseases.

Sexual therapists may even sometimes prescribe masturbation for individuals struggling to achieve or delay orgasm. Masturbation only becomes a serious issue if it is done compulsively or excessively, to the point that it disrupts a person’s daily life. Consulting a sex therapist may be necessary to manage such a situation. 

Anal sex

Anal sex or the stimulation of the anus during intercourse is steadily becoming more accepted by both men and women in society. However, the medical community says that the anus is not “designed” for sex like the vagina. The former has a thinner lining, which makes it more prone to damage. Any cuts or tears in and around the anus puts people at risk of contracting venereal diseases such as chlamydia, genital herpes and warts, gonorrhea, and HIV, among others.  Those planning to engage in anal sex should wear condoms and use water-based lubricants. Also, for it to be an enjoyable experience, the receiving partner should try to relax and prepare for the activity. When shifting to vaginal sex, wear a new condom to avoid transferring anal bacteria that may cause urinary tract infections.

Sexually transmitted diseases

Most sexually transmitted infections manifest with the following symptoms:

  • Unusual discharge from the sexual organ
  • Pain during urination
  • Rashes
  • Lumps
  • Abnormal skin growths around the genitals
  • Unusual bleeding
  • Itchiness around genitalia
  • Painful sores
It is important that you practice safe sex and regularly have yourself checked for STIs if you are sexually active with multiple partners. Doctors can cure certain STDs and provide vaccines. However, other conditions like HIV do not yet have a cure, and doctors merely manage symptoms to prevent them from developing into something more serious.If you suspect that you have an STD, head to a sex clinic or hospital for proper diagnosis and treatment. Avoid sexual contact until confirmation of diagnosis.

Same-sex activities

There is an increasing number of people who are engaging in same-sex activities, regardless of their sexual identity.

As with any sexual encounter, people must be mindful of the general health risks. The Center for Disease Control (CDC), in particular, noted that gay and bisexual men have higher rates of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Aside from engaging in safe sex, the CDC recommends getting vaccines for conditions such as hepatitis, the flu, and the human papillomavirus for added protection.

Key Takeaways

Regardless of sexual orientation or attraction, those who engage in sexual activity must always be careful. Sexual health should be a priority, and you are encouraged to take the necessary precautions to prevent the contraction of diseases. Feel free to discuss your sexual history and issues with your partner and doctor, especially when it comes to sex health questions we are too embarrassed to ask.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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