What are your concerns?

close
Inaccurate
Hard to understand
Other

Or copy link

New

Broken Dick: Prevention, Treatment, and Effects on Fertility

Broken Dick: Prevention, Treatment, and Effects on Fertility

A broken dick’s medical term is called penile fracture, and this happens when a dick hits on something hard, during sex or otherwise. Does this have any long-term effects on sexual performance and fertility? Learn more here.

How Do You Get a Broken Dick?

Although it is quite rare, there are several cases/accidents wherein it would result in a broken dick, please refer to the bullet list below:

  • Accidents during sexual activities can cause broken dick. For instance, during intercourse, when a man takes his penis out and thrusts into the wrong area and ends up hitting the pelvic bone or perineum (an area near the anus) then that would lead to a broken dick. The amount of force from thrusting and hitting those areas are enough to cause penile fracture.
  • Energetic masturbation can also lead to broken dick. When masturbating, there should not be too much force or pressure being exerted on the penis as this may fracture it.
  • There is a certain practice done by Middle Eastern and Central Asian men called Taqaandan, wherein they bend an erect penis in order to get rid of an erect penis or to change the size and shape of a penis. Of course, this type of practice may lead to a broken dick, since there is direct applied force being exerted to bend an erect penis.
  • A broken dick can also be caused by falling on an erect penis. Other accidents would include rolling over one’s erect penis during sleep or hitting an erect penis against a hard surface like a wall, a table, or a door. This usually happens when a room is completely dark.

A penis can easily become broken since this body part does not have any bones in it. So when a blunt force is applied, it can damage the outer lining (tunica albuginea) of the two cylinders in the penis. These two cylinders are called corpora cavernosa and these are filled with blood when a penis is erect.

Signs and Symptoms

A penile fracture would often look swollen and purple. There are also other symptoms of having a broken dick such as:

  • Penile pain
  • Discoloration of the shaft
  • Swollen penile shaft
  • Hearing a popping or cracking sound from the penis
  • Losing an erection fast

In addition, a broken dick can cause damage to the urethra (the duct or tube where urine flows through) and blood may also come from the opening of the penis.

Can a Broken Dick Be Fixed?

Yes, a broken dick can be fixed so long as it would be addressed quickly. Once you know that your penis is fractured, you must visit a doctor immediately and have it looked at. A broken dick would mainly be fixed by means of surgery.

The type of surgery to be done on a broken dick depends on the severity of the fracture. For example, if the penis became fractured due to sexual activities like intercourse, the surgery will be done by:

  • Putting the person under anesthesia.
  • A cut will be made to the area around the head of the penis and then the skin will be pulled back so that the inner surface of the penis can be seen.
  • The doctor would then proceed to remove blood clots, which would help in finding tears that could be present in the tunica albuginea.
  • Once the tear or tears have been spotted, they will be repaired and then the cut skin will be sewn together afterwards.
  • In most cases, a catheter is temporarily used to drain the urine from the bladder. This is done in order to make room for the penis to heal.
  • After surgery, the penis will stay bandaged. Also, a person would most likely stay in the hospital for two days.
  • Lastly, the person who underwent surgery may or may not go home with a catheter, depending on their healing status. They will also be given medications for the pain.

Severe Case

As for severe cases of broken dick wherein a part of the penis is amputated, the amputated part will be covered in gauze and soaked in a clean salt solution. Then the penis will be placed inside a plastic bag. In some cases, the penis can be reattached. The chances of having an amputated penis rebuilt would solely depend on the severity of the injury.

Can a Broken Dick Affect Performance and Fertility?

In most cases, a broken dick does not affect fertility, however, this only applies to penises that have not been completely amputated. Since sperm is stored in the testicles, fertility will not be affected, although men would need assistance.

When it comes to performance, broken dicks do have an effect on them. There are several complications that would affect performance such as:

  • Infection
  • Priapism (painful erection)
  • Curved or bent penis
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Fistulas

Key Takeaways

In case of a broken dick, you must immediately seek medical help. The earlier it gets treated the better. This is to prevent severe complications from happening as well. Treat penile fractures as an emergency and do not let them heal by themselves.

Learn more bout Safe Sex here.

Ovulation Calculator

Ovulation Calculator

Tracking your period cycle, determines your most fertile days and increases your chance of conceiving or applying for birth control.

Ovulation Calculator

Tracking your period cycle, determines your most fertile days and increases your chance of conceiving or applying for birth control.

Ovulation Calculator

Cycle Length

(days)

28

Period Duration

(days)

7

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Penile fracture, https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21707-penile-fracture, Accessed October 22, 2021

Penis fracture, https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/sexual-health/expert-answers/penis-fracture/faq-20058154, Accessed October 22, 2021

Prevention of Penile Trauma, https://www.urologyhealth.org/urology-a-z/p/penile-trauma, Accessed October 22, 2021

Traumatic Penile Injury, https://fertilitypedia.org/edu/diagnoses/traumatic-penile-injury, Accessed October 22, 2021

 

Picture of the authorbadge
Written by Jen Mallari Updated May 12
Medically reviewed by Regina Victoria Boyles, MD