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Ozone Therapy Benefits: Will It Really Improve Your Health?

Ozone Therapy Benefits: Will It Really Improve Your Health?

You probably saw some public figures undergo a “dialysis-looking” procedure where blood is drawn, passed through a machine, and returned to the body. Celebrities claim that these procedures are okay and that the treatment actually helps them stay healthy because it “purifies” their blood. The procedure is called extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation (EBOO), and it’s one type of ozone therapy. Here’s what you need to know about ozone therapy benefits and risk.

Extracorporeal Blood Oxygenation and Ozonation (EBOO) Treatment, An Overview

Undergoing the EBOO treatment means you’ll have an intravenous tube connected to each of your arms. The other end of the tubes connects to a machine, forming a complete circle.

Basically, what happens is similar to dialysis treatment. Your blood goes out of one arm, enters the machine, and returns to the body via the other arm. According to reports, the machine doesn’t just filter the blood to get rid of toxins, but it also adds oxygen and medical ozone.

The oxygenation and ozonation occur outside the body (in the machine); hence, the term extracorporeal.

Please do not confuse EBOO with ECMO, which stands for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, an accepted medical procedure that pumps and oxygenates the blood outside the body. Generally, ECMO allows the heart and lungs to rest. Patients recovering from heart surgery, lung failure, and heart failure may benefit from having this procedure.

The Purported Ozone Therapy Benefits

Since EBOO treatment is not a standard procedure in the Philippines, let’s briefly discuss one of its components: ozonation.

We understand that our cells need adequate oxygen to function well, but what is ozonation for? What are the potential ozone therapy benefits?

Ozonation is the process of adding ozone, a molecule consisting of 3 atoms of oxygen, to the blood. This ozone gas may be structurally similar to the ozone in the Earth’s stratosphere, but it’s only generated in the laboratory.

A clinical review mentioned that ozone therapy might have therapeutic benefits for:

  • Arthritis
  • Viral diseases
  • Ischemic heart disease
  • Cancer macular degeneration

The same report also stated that ozone therapy might potentially boost or activate the immune system. Note that EBOO treatment is one type of ozone therapy.

EBOO Treatment in the Philippines: Is It Effective?

Several private health facilities offer EBOO treatment in the Philippines; however, please note that it is not a proven treatment for any disease, nor is it verified to boost a person’s immune system.

And while there are numerous papers about ozone therapy benefits, very few talk about EBOO in particular. One report concluded that EBOO therapy improved skin lesions in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). It likewise noted that the treatment had a positive effect on the participants’ general condition.

Bottom line: the effectiveness of ozone therapy, including EBOO treatment in the Philippines, is not yet established.

Safety Concerns Surrounding EBOO treatment

Since there are very few studies about EBOO treatment, it isn’t easy to ascertain if it’s safe for everyone, especially those with underlying health conditions.

According to the US FDA, inhaling the ozone gas is toxic. And while EBOO treatment doesn’t involve inhalation of ozone, authorities still don’t have enough data to conclude whether or not extracorporeal ozonation is safe.

A 2005 report from the Ministry of Health in Malaysia also indicated that some people who received ozone therapy developed blood-borne infections, air embolism, and bilateral visual field loss.

Key Takeaways

Extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation (EBOO) treatment, a type of ozone therapy, introduces oxygen and ozone to the blood via a machine. Ozone therapy has several purported benefits, but to date, its safety and effectiveness are still questionable. EBOO treatment is available in the Philippines, but please keep in mind that it’s not a proven treatment for any disease.

Learn more about other Medical Procedures here.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Sources

Extracorporeal blood oxygenation and ozonation: Clinical and biological implications of ozone therapy
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7605837_Extracorporeal_blood_oxygenation_and_ozonation_Clinical_and_biological_implications_of_ozone_therapy
Accessed July 16, 2021

Ozone therapy: A clinical review
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312702/
Accessed July 16, 2021

Extracorporeal Blood Oxygenation and Ozonation (EBOO): A Controlled Trial in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease
https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/039139880502801012
Accessed July 16, 2021

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=801.415
Accessed July 16, 2021

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO)
https://www.ucsfhealth.org/treatments/extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation
Accessed July 16, 2021

Ozone Therapy
https://www.moh.gov.my/moh/resources/auto%20download%20images/587f119c1d08d.pdf
Accessed July 16, 2021

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Written by Lorraine Bunag, R.N. Updated 2 weeks ago
Fact Checked by Hello Doctor Medical Panel
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