Methyclothiazide

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Update Date 11/05/2020 . 8 mins read
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Uses

What is Methyclothiazide used for?

Methyclothiazide is used to treat high blood pressure. Lowering high blood pressure helps prevent strokes, heart attacks, and kidney problems. Methyclothiazide is a “water pill” (diuretic) that causes your body to get rid of extra salt and water. This increases the amount of urine you make.

This medication also reduces extra fluid in the body (edema) caused by conditions such as congestive heart failure, liver disease, and kidney disease. Getting rid of extra water helps to reduce fluid in the lungs so that you can breathe easier. It also helps to decrease swelling of the arms, legs, and stomach/abdomen.

How should I take Methyclothiazide?

Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor. It is best to avoid taking this medication within 4 hours of your bedtime to avoid having to get up to urinate. Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have questions about your dosing schedule.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. The manufacturer recommends that you do not take more than 10 milligrams as a single daily dose to treat edema or more than 5 milligrams daily to treat high blood pressure.

Use this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day or as prescribed. Do not increase your dose, skip doses, or stop taking this medication unless directed by your doctor. It is important to continue taking this medication even if you feel well. Most people with high blood pressure do not feel sick. For the treatment of high blood pressure, it may take up to several weeks before the full benefit of this drug takes effect.

Cholestyramine and colestipol can decrease the absorption of this medication by your body. If you are taking either of these drugs, separate them from methyclothiazide by at least 4 hours.

Inform your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens (e.g., swelling increases, your routine blood pressure readings increase).

How do I store Methyclothiazide?

Methyclothiazide is best stored at room temperature away from direct light and moisture. To prevent drug damage, you should not store Methyclothiazide in the bathroom or the freezer. There may be different brands of Methyclothiazide that may have different storage needs. It is important to always check the product package for instructions on storage, or ask your pharmacist. For safety, you should keep all medicines away from children and pets.

You should not flush Methyclothiazide down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. It is important to properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Precautions & warnings

What should I know before using Methyclothiazide?

Before taking methyclothiazide, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

This medication should not be used if you have certain medical conditions. Before using this medicine, consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have: severe kidney disease (inability to make urine).

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney disease, liver disease, untreated salt/mineral imbalance (e.g., imbalance of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), loss of too much body water (dehydration), gout, lupus, certain recent nerve surgery (sympathectomy).

If you have diabetes, methyclothiazide may affect your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar regularly as directed and share the results with your doctor. Tell your doctor right away if you have symptoms of high blood sugar such as increased thirst/urination. Your doctor may need to adjust your diabetes medication, exercise program, or diet.

This drug may reduce the potassium levels in your blood. Ask your doctor about increasing the amount of potassium in your diet (e.g., bananas, orange juice) or about using a salt substitute containing potassium. A potassium supplement may be prescribed by your doctor.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking this medication.

This drug may make you dizzy or cause blurred vision. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness or clear vision until you are sure you can perform such activities safely. Limit alcoholic beverages.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position. Significant loss of body water from too much sweating, vomiting, or diarrhea can also lower your blood pressure and worsen dizziness. Drink plenty of fluids to prevent these effects and dehydration. If you are on restricted fluid intake, consult your doctor for further instructions. Contact your doctor if you are unable to drink fluids or if you have persistent diarrhea/vomiting.

Kidney function declines as you grow older. This medication is removed by the kidneys. Therefore, the elderly may be more sensitive to the effects of this drug, especially dizziness.

This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

This drug passes into breast milk. While there have been no reports of harm to nursing infants, consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Is it safe during pregnancy or breast-feeding?

There are no adequate studies in women for determining risk when using this Methyclothiazide during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Please always consult with your doctor to weigh the potential benefits and risks before taking Methyclothiazide. Methyclothiazide is pregnancy risk category B according to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

FDA pregnancy risk category reference below:

  • A=No risk,
  • B=No risk in some studies,
  • C=There may be some risk,
  • D=Positive evidence of risk,
  • X=Contraindicated,
  • N=Unknown

Side effects

What side effects can occur from Methyclothiazide?

Dizziness, lightheadedness, headache, blurred vision, loss of appetite, stomach upset, diarrhea, or constipation may occur as your body adjusts to the medication. You may also experience decreased sexual ability. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

This medication may cause a loss of too much body water (dehydration) and salt/minerals. Tell your doctor right away if you have any of these unlikely but serious symptoms of dehydration or mineral loss: very dry mouth, thirst, muscle cramps, weakness, fast/irregular heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, severe dizziness, unusual drowsiness, fainting, confusion, seizures.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: numbness/tingling of the arms/legs, joint pain (e.g., big toe pain).

Tell your doctor right away if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), easy bruising/bleeding, stomach/abdominal pain, persistent nausea/vomiting, unusual/persistent tiredness, yellowing eyes/skin, dark urine, signs of kidney problems (such as change in the amount of urine).

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: decrease in vision, eye pain.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

Not everyone experiences these side effects. There may be some side effects not listed above. If you have any concerns about a side-effect, please consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Interactions

What drugs may interact with Methyclothiazide?

This drug should not be used with the following medications because very serious interactions may occur: cisapride, dofetilide.

If you are currently using any of these medications, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting methyclothiazide.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: diazoxide, digoxin, lithium, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g., ibuprofen, indomethacin).

Some products have ingredients that could raise your blood pressure. Tell your pharmacist what products you are using, and ask how to use them safely (especially cough-and-cold products, diet aids, or NSAIDs such as ibuprofen/naproxen).

This product can affect the results of certain lab tests. Make sure laboratory personnel and all your doctors know you use this drug.

Methyclothiazide may interact with other drugs that you are currently taking, which can change how your drug works or increase your risk for serious side effects. To avoid any potential drug interactions, you should keep a list of all the drugs you are using (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. For your safety, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any drugs without your doctor’s approval.

Does food or alcohol interact with Methyclothiazide?

Methyclothiazide may interact with food or alcohol by altering the way the drug works or increasing the risk for serious side effects. Do not take this drug with alcohol as it may increase the risk and severity of orthostatic hypotension and fainting. Please discuss with your doctor or pharmacist any potential food or alcohol interactions before using this drug.

What health conditions may interact with Methyclothiazide?

Methyclothiazide may interact with your health condition. This interaction may worsen your health condition or alter the way the drug works. Special precautions should be taken with patients with SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus), gout, parathyroid disease, asthma, hepatic, or renal impairment. It is important to always let your doctor and pharmacist know all the health conditions you currently have.

Dosage

The information provided is not a substitute for any medical advice. You should ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist before using this Methyclothiazide.

What is the dose of Methyclothiazide for an adult?

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension

2.5 to 5 mg orally once a day

Comments: If blood pressure remains uncontrolled after 8 to 12 weeks at 5 mg once a day, another antihypertensive drug should be added.

Uses: Treatment of mild to moderate hypertension as monotherapy; treatment of more severe hypertension when used concomitantly with other antihypertensive drugs.

Usual Adult Dose for Edema

2.5 to 5 mg orally once a day

Maximum dose: 10 mg

Uses: Adjunctive treatment of edema associated with congestive heart failure, hepatic cirrhosis, and corticosteroid and estrogen therapy; this drug has also been useful in edema due to various forms of renal dysfunction (e.g., nephrotic syndrome, acute glomerulonephritis, and chronic renal failure).

Renal Dose Adjustments

Use with caution

If progressive renal impairment becomes evident as indicated by a rising BUN or nonprotein nitrogen: Consider withholding or discontinuing this drug

Liver Dose Adjustments

Use with caution

Other Comments

Storage requirements: Protect from light.

Monitoring:

-Metabolic: Serum electrolytes periodically.

Patient advice: Advise patients to report any of the following symptoms of electrolyte imbalance: dry mouth, thirst, weakness, tiredness, drowsiness, restlessness, muscle pains or cramps, nausea, vomiting, or increased heart rate.

What is the dose of Methyclothiazide for a child?

The dosage has not been established in pediatric patients. It may be unsafe for your child. It is always important to fully understand the safety of the drug before using. Please consult with your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How is Methyclothiazide available?

Methyclothiazide is available in the following dosage forms and strengths:

  • Oral tablet,
  • Compounding powder.

What should I do in case of an emergency or overdose?

In case of an emergency or an overdose, call your local emergency services or go to your nearest emergency room.

What should I do if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Methyclothiazide, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your regular dose as scheduled. Do not take a double dose.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Hello Health Group does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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